Engine Number

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Simon Rankin 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #605

    Simon Rankin
    Participant

      Hi everyone

      New on here and I’m actually in UK

      Recently purchased a SA Cortina MK3 GT Big Six. The original Essex needed a head gasket change and overhaul but I found and bought a NOS Essex. This is a Samcor engine with hydraulic lifters. What I understand is the engine has Cologne 2.8 Rockers, extra oil feed, different exhaust manifolds, different rocker covers and came with the Piersburg twin choke. This one has a manifold for a single choke carb but am swapping the manifold from the UK Essex so it runs on the Weber 38DGAS. I have an engine number but can’t find any info here in the UK on it. Was wondering if any of you knowledgeable folk could shed any light on year of manufacture/output etc. The number is CA9US0185. The number on the inlet manifold is FO 142536

      Cheers

      Simon

      #606

      Kim Warner
      Keymaster

        In South Africa this was referred to as the “upgraded V6, came out in the Sierra/Sapphire and the Courier LDV (based on the Mazda LDV).
        Later a 3.4 liter version was released profiled for higher torque for 4×4 application in the Courier.

        These were the “Black Block” or 30u engines.  The introduction of hydraulic lifters also eliminated the “tappet racket” so common on earlier V6’s

        The Pierberg was a wonderful Carb too, smoother and more economical than the 38DGAS, but never very well loved, probably due to a resistance to change.

        Locally service and rebuild kits for these engines are freely available, so if you needing a specific part, shout
        Power 110kw@5700
        Torque 232Nm @ 3250

         

        • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by  Kim Warner.
        #608

        Kim Warner
        Keymaster

          South Africa[edit]
          In South Africa, the engine continued in production from 1982 up to April 2000 for use in the Sapphire Saloon and Sierra vehicles, and Courier pick-ups. Late in its production life it was fitted with Lucas controlled electronic fuel injection designed by SAMCOR (South African Motor Corporation – now Ford SA) in co-operation with the University of Pretoria’s engineering department. This conversion resulted in a power increase from 103 kW (140 PS; 138 bhp) to 110 kW (150 PS; 148 bhp) of the standard 3.0 version, and 117 kW (159 PS; 157 bhp) for the fuel injection version, plus a useful boost to fuel economy. Only about 1,600 of the EFI variants were produced during 1992 and 1993. In October 1997, the 3.0L was enlarged to 3.4L by boring the cylinders 1 to 94.6 mm (0.039 to 3.724 in) and a new crankshaft with a stroke of 80 mm (3.15 in) giving a displacement of 3.4 L (3,375 cc), this was done for the engine to be better suited to 4×4 vehicles where torque is needed. The 3.4 version produced 108 kW (147 PS; 145 bhp) and 260 N⋅m (192 lb⋅ft). All 3.4 variants used the 38DGAS Weber carburetor with 29 mm (1.1 in) venturis. Production tooling at the factory was scrapped and sold in 2000, to make way for the production of a new four cylinder OHC engine, the remaining old stock of 3.4 L Engines started to be sold as assembled crate engines, these engines had some differences from the 2.5 3.0 and 3.1 L Dagenham built engines such as: Ford Cologne 2.8 / 2.9 V6 forged connecting rods, German made pistons with moly coating, 1⁄4 in (6.4 mm) smaller crank journals which reduced bearing speed, more aggressive camshaft timing and higher lift, larger 43 mm (1.7 in) inlet valves, shaft mounted rockers from Ford’s Cologne 2.8 / 2.9 V6 engine, unique cylinder head castings with extra oil galleries, solid pushrods with no oiling holes, unique exhaust manifold bolt pattern due to the head castings also being unique to the 3.4-litre engine and an improved inlet manifold with larger runners and an improved plenum chamber.[33] From 1966 to 1998, the 3.0L was also used in industrial applications such as generator plants, airport vehicles, milk vans, jet boats (Hamilton jet) and even river barges.

          Sourced from Wikipedia
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Essex_V6_engine_(UK)

           

          #609

          Kim Warner
          Keymaster

            South Africa[edit]
            In South Africa, the engine continued in production from 1982 up to April 2000 for use in the Sapphire Saloon and Sierra vehicles, and Courier pick-ups. Late in its production life it was fitted with Lucas controlled electronic fuel injection designed by SAMCOR (South African Motor Corporation – now Ford SA) in co-operation with the University of Pretoria’s engineering department. This conversion resulted in a power increase from 103 kW (140 PS; 138 bhp) to 110 kW (150 PS; 148 bhp) of the standard 3.0 version, and 117 kW (159 PS; 157 bhp) for the fuel injection version, plus a useful boost to fuel economy. Only about 1,600 of the EFI variants were produced during 1992 and 1993. In October 1997, the 3.0L was enlarged to 3.4L by boring the cylinders 1 to 94.6 mm (0.039 to 3.724 in) and a new crankshaft with a stroke of 80 mm (3.15 in) giving a displacement of 3.4 L (3,375 cc), this was done for the engine to be better suited to 4×4 vehicles where torque is needed. The 3.4 version produced 108 kW (147 PS; 145 bhp) and 260 N⋅m (192 lb⋅ft). All 3.4 variants used the 38DGAS Weber carburetor with 29 mm (1.1 in) venturis. Production tooling at the factory was scrapped and sold in 2000, to make way for the production of a new four cylinder OHC engine, the remaining old stock of 3.4 L Engines started to be sold as assembled crate engines, these engines had some differences from the 2.5 3.0 and 3.1 L Dagenham built engines such as: Ford Cologne 2.8 / 2.9 V6 forged connecting rods, German made pistons with moly coating, 1⁄4 in (6.4 mm) smaller crank journals which reduced bearing speed, more aggressive camshaft timing and higher lift, larger 43 mm (1.7 in) inlet valves, shaft mounted rockers from Ford’s Cologne 2.8 / 2.9 V6 engine, unique cylinder head castings with extra oil galleries, solid pushrods with no oiling holes, unique exhaust manifold bolt pattern due to the head castings also being unique to the 3.4-litre engine and an improved inlet manifold with larger runners and an improved plenum chamber.[33] From 1966 to 1998, the 3.0L was also used in industrial applications such as generator plants, airport vehicles, milk vans, jet boats (Hamilton jet) and even river barges.

            Sourced from Wikipedia
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Essex_V6_engine_(UK)

             

            #610

            Simon Rankin
            Participant

              Thanks Kim really appreciate that

              The upgraded V6 I acquired came with an inlet manifold for a single carb it looks like. Seems odd. I’m wanting to put the inlet manifold, which has a Weber 38DGAS, onto the upgraded and apart from a few modifications required to fit should this be a problem. Also just out of interest how easy are inlet manifolds for a twin choke for the upgraded v6 to get in SA? And if so how much

              Thanks again

              Simon

            Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)

            You must be logged in to reply to this topic.